Follow Us on Our Blog!

Singapore Tuition, O, A Levels

Thank you for visiting us! In addition to the information given on this website, we also blog regularly on education, society, life, faith, love, philosophy, human nature and all that make up what Plato and Aristotle called ‘the good life’. Beyond the mundane and material life that surrounds us, we hope this blog can serve as a little oasis to share a more excellent way of thinking, doing and living our lives. So starting from the most recent posts below, do follow us on this journey! And we hope you will drop us a comment or two at ask@irwins-study.com to let us know your thoughts or just to let us know how we are doing. =)

Read More

?!&*)

Cambridge students were asked in an exam to write about a poem which included no words, just punctuation. How would you go about making sense of it, asks Jon Kelly in this interesting short article from BBC News.

GP Tuition

Makes one wonder whether this is ingenious or just pretentious? Or do we just not get it? =P

Read More

When young men don’t talk

While preparing GP resources on the concept of beauty in our modern society to discuss with my students in our next few lessons, I came across this interesting article in the Telegraph on how teenage boys struggle as much as young girls when it comes to self-image. Overstimulated by technology, warped by porn, lacking male role models, bombarded by perfect body images, it’s no surprise that young men today are grappling with issues of gender identity. Once viewed as the sole remit of girls, the realization now is that boys are also struggling just as much, with the difference being that guys are simply less able to articulate their needs. After all, generations of social conditioning tells us that men don’t “do” feelings. But we need to start taking notice that in the last decade, a beauty and fitness industry which has relentlessly pursued the male market, coupled with the increasingly visual nature of a society which communicates almost exclusively via the Internet, has taken its toll on young men. As the writer of the article aptly concludes, “we need to recognise that emotions have no gender.”

How then should we help? The article gives a few ideas, which are not novel or surprising, but sadly, sorely lacking at times when we deal with adolescent men.

What can be done to help them? Parents and teachers can create environments where young men feel safe and empowered enough to tell us that they feel vulnerable. Dads, uncles and male family friends can lead by example, instigating conversations around topics such as body image and mental health. The medical profession can supply the same level of understanding and resources for men suffering from issues such as eating disorders and depression as they do for women. Most importantly, as a society we can all work to reduce the stigma that still surrounds men who talk openly about their feelings.

GP Tuition

Read More

Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.